Teenage boy reading Hopkins CF Newsletter: Partners in Discovery

Partners in Discovery: Archives

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Winter 2015

The Transition
As the average life expectancy of patients with CF has risen dramatically over the past 20 years, more and more patients are living on their own, attending college and pursuing careers.By developing compounds that push proteins to the surface of the lungs and then turn them on, researchers aim to correct the salt and water imbalance that causes cystic fibrosis. By developing compounds that push proteins to the surface of the lungs and then turn them on, researchers aim to correct the salt and water imbalance that causes cystic fibrosis.


Spring 2012

Modifying Disease
By developing compounds that push proteins to the surface of the lungs and then turn them on, researchers aim to correct the salt and water imbalance that causes cystic fibrosis. By developing compounds that push proteins to the surface of the lungs and then turn them on, researchers aim to correct the salt and water imbalance that causes cystic fibrosis.


Spring 2011

Understanding Inflammation
Researcher Neeraj Vij uncovers new clues regarding airway inflammation in CF


Winter 2010

CF and Diabetes
Researcher Scott Blackman’s search for modifier genes to tailor treatment.


Spring 2009

Alternative Chloride Channels
CFTR isn’t the only kid on the block when it comes to chloride channels. ClC-2, pulmonologist Pam Zeitlin is finding, may provide a parallel pathway for chloride secretion.


Fall 2008

Coming Down the Pipeline
CFTR-targeted drugs lead a diverse pack of therapies to improve quality of life, extend survival and find a cure for CF patients.


Winter 2008

The Jigsaw Puzzle of CF Lung Disease Severity
What is it in the genes and environment that really makes a difference? Why does one cystic fibrosis patient have only mild lung disease while another patient with the same CFTR mutations-suffers sever lung disease? Are genes other CFTR responsible for these variations? Or is the environment the cause?


Summer 2007

Studying the Science of Resistance
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nasty bug, infecting nearly 80 percent of all CF patients. And its success lies in its ability to resist many common antibiotics thrown at it. In fact, although immediate treatment with antibiotics can clear the infection, in many cases the bacteria adapt and establish permanent colonies in the lungs, increasing sputum production and decreasing lung function.


Fall 2006

Advancing the Knowledge
A distinct advantage to being a patient of The Johns Hopkins Cystic Fibrosis Center is that the doctors you see regularly are contributing significantly to the understanding and management of cystic fibrosis worldwide.


January 2006

Raising the Bar on CF Care
Quality improvement sounds like a buzzword straight out of corporate America: how are we going to improve the quality of these widgets we’re building?


September 2005

Piloting the Enterprise
Master multi-taskers, research coordinators keep clinical trials running smoothly.


January 2005

Environment, More than Genes, Influences CF Lung Disease Severity
As scientists continue to learn more about the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis—CFTR—it is becoming clear that this genetic mutation alone does not determine why the severity of CF differs so much from person to person.